Blog Tour: The Winner's Kiss by Marie Rutkoski

Welcome to the Working for the Mandroid stop on Marie Rutkoski's The Winner's Kiss, the last book in her The Winner's Curse series. I am so excited about this book. This series has been so exciting and squeal-inducing and just lovely all around. To celebrate the release of The Winner's Kiss on March 29, bloggers around the interwebs have been sharing their favorite kisses from books new and old. I'll be sharing my own later in the post, but first, more about The Winner's Kiss.

The Winner's Kiss
by Marie Rutkoski

On Sale March 29th, 2016

War has begun. Arin is in the thick of it with untrustworthy new allies and the empire as his enemy. Though he has convinced himself that he no longer loves Kestrel, Arin hasn’t forgotten her, or how she became exactly the kind of person he has always despised. She cared more for the empire than she did for the lives of innocent people—and certainly more than she did for him.
At least, that’s what he thinks.
In the frozen north, Kestrel is a prisoner in a brutal work camp. As she searches desperately for a way to escape, she wishes Arin could know what she sacrificed for him. She wishes she could make the empire pay for what they’ve done to her.
But no one gets what they want just by wishing.
As the war intensifies, both Kestrel and Arin discover that the world is changing. The East is pitted against the West, and they are caught in between. With so much to lose, can anybody really win?

About the Author

Marie Rutkoski is the author of The Kronos Chronicles, including The Cabinet of Wonders and The Celestial Globe. The Cabinet of Wonders, her debut novel, was named an Indie Next Kids’ List Great Read and a Bank Street Best Children’s Book of the Year, among other honors. Rutkoski grew up in Bolingbrook, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago), as the oldest of four children. She attended the University of Iowa, where she took Writers’ Workshop classes and studied with Pulitzer Prize-winner James Alan McPherson. After graduating, she lived in Moscow and Prague. Upon receiving her Ph.D. from Harvard University, she held dual appointments as a lecturer there in both English and American Literature and Language, and History and Literature. Rutkoski is currently a professor at Brooklyn College, where she teaches Renaissance Drama, children’s literature and creative writing. She lives in New York City with her husband and cat. 

 

Now about that favorite kiss...

Hello, friends and strangers. Remember me? It’s been quite some time since I’ve truly written a post for WFTM. I could blame a job that is drowning me in madness. Or a wedding that I don’t have the faintest idea how to plan and yet somehow am planning anyway. Or just a general lack of apathy or time or patience. Or how everyone wants to hang out with me these days and I’m rarely home. Whatever the reason, I have been missing and I am sad about it.

But today! Today we talk about kissing! Now I’m not a mushy person. In fact I am best described by the following t-shirt graphic:

And yet there was once a day when I enjoyed a good kissing scene, especially if it were earned. Alas, my brain is now more swiss cheese than brain matter, and I don’t remember all the best ones. So I tried cheated. I looked at all the other wonderful bloggers who were part of the tour, except most of them chose books I’d never heard of or hadn’t read. That’s no help.

So I googled best literary kisses and that came up with… more books I’ve never heard of or hadn’t read. Then I despaired about all the amazing books I’ve never heard of or read and WHERE IS ALL THE READING TIME?

But finally I settled on my choice. And it was the first choice that came to mind at the thought of the topic, so I’m not entirely sure why I tried to cheat anyway.

What Book Is Your Favorite Literary Kiss In?

It’s not quite “literary”, but it’s going to be Soulless by Gail Carriger.

Who Is Kissing?

She of the soulless nature, one Alexia Tarrabotti, and the very uncivilized Lord Maccon.

Why Is It Your Favorite?

I am quite fond of love-hate relationships that turn into a happily romantic pairing between equals who respect one another, and the relationship between Alexia and Lord Maccon check all those boxes. I’m also fond of slightly rough make out sessions that take place in fancy libraries. Though this scene doesn’t tick the library box, I do get one of those later in the book.

So let me set up the scene: Alexia keeps attracting unsavory sorts who either want to kill her or recruit her. The latest was a weird man that snuck into her carriage. She’s escaped with the help of Lord Maccon, who demands she have a body guard type person with her at all times. She is infuriated and there is arguing, some flirty teasing and then some anger on the part of Lord Maccon. Then simply…

The earl grabbed Miss Tarabotti’s chin with one big hand and the small of her back with the other, pulling her toward him hard. He slanted his mouth over hers almost violently.
She jerked back. “What are you…?”
“Only way to keep you quiet,” he grumbled, taking her chin in a firmer grip and planting his mouth atop hers once more.
It was not the kind of kiss Alexia had ever experienced before. Not that she had been kissed all that frequently prior to this particular point in time.
The kiss itself was initially quite gentle: slow and soft. Alexia found it surprising given the violence of his embrace. She also found it faintly unsatisfying. She gave a little murmur of frustration and leaned in toward him. Then the kiss changed. It became harder, rougher, parting her lips with purpose. There was even, shockingly, tongue involved in the proceedings. Miss Tarabotti was not certain about that. It bordered on sloppy, but then again, the sheer heat of it … Her pragmatic preternatural self assessed the situation and realized that she could definitely learn to love the taste of him: like one of those expensive French soups, dark and rick. She arched her back. Her breath had gone all uneven, perhaps because her mouth was clogged with kisses. Alexia was just beginning to come to terms with the tongue concept and notice that she was now getting too warm to need the earl’s jacket, when he left off kissing, pushed the coat roughly down, and started nibbling on her neck.

And it continues – quite scandalously for events happening in a Victorian street – until they’re rudely interrupted by Maccon’s associate with news of the latest threat to Alexia’s life. This is only the first – and probably tamest – kiss in the book, much less the series. I guess I like my love affair with a bit of self-deprecating humor and sarcasm.

Now What Kiss Do I Want to See in The Winner’s Kiss?

Well, Kestrel and Arin, of course. Those two need a happy ending after all their misunderstandings and standing on opposite ends of the battle field. I want happiness and joy and safety, though I have a feeling some more pain and suffering will be felt on all sides before everything comes to an end.

So what is your favorite kiss from a book? Share in the comments or join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #TheWinnersKiss.


And regular activity at WFTM will start up soon. Hopefully? Maybe after this wedding? If anyone is still around?