Author Blog Tour Review: The Green Memory of Fear by B.A. Chepaitis

Over the last few week's I've been reviewing the five books in Barbara Chepaitis' Jaguar Addams series in preparation for her tour stops here at Working for the Mandroid. Yesterday Ms. Chepaitis contributed a guest post regarding writing the series. Today I review the most recent book in the series, The Green Memory of Fear, which happens to be the creepiest of the lot.

To learn more about Barbara and the series, visit her website Wildreads.com, her blog ALiteraryLunch.blogspot.com or on Facebook.

The Green Memory of Fear
BA Chepaitis

Wildside Press (2011)
171 pages
Adult / Sci-Fi / Action

Purchase it from Amazon

On Prison Planetoid three, Jaguar Addams uses her empathic gifts to make criminals face the fears that drive their heinous acts. Very few escape the telepathic web she weaves around them. . . .until now.

When Jaguar takes on a home planet assignment, investigating a psychiatrist on trial for abuse of a little boy, s he finds a killer unlike any she's faced before. Dr. Senci's psi skills are a match for her own, and unless she consents to do as he wants, he'll use them to kill everyone she loves. Once she realizes who and what he really is, she leaves the Planetoid to go after him. But Supervisor Alex Dzarny isn't about to let her go it alone, even if it means losing his own life to save hers.

It’s been a really long time since I’ve spent so much time with a character within a couple of weeks. It’ll feel kind of weird not having another Jaguar adventure to move into as my next read. I’ll to remain satisfied that this fifth volume in Chepaitis’ Jaguar Addams series is the best of the lot. It’s creepy, entertaining and surprising in ways that the previous books didn’t even touch.

The Green Memory of Fear follows a few months after the events of A Lunatic Fear. Jaguar and Alex are remaining a bit standoffish despite the advancement in their relationship in the previous book, and they are both trying to recover from the contamination that had such drastic effects on their psychic abilities. In this frame of mind, Jaguar finds that she’s receiving signs leading her to a new case that would take her back to the home planet to act as a researcher, something she’s never done. Upon finding out she’d requested the job, Alex knows something is up and everything starts to converge, filling in blanks in both of their characters as they both finally have to confront their own fears in the same way they’ve been using on the prisoners.

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Author Blog Tour Guest Post: B.A. Chepaitis, Author of the Jaguar Addams Series

Over the last few week's I've been reviewing the five books in Barbara Chepaitis' Jaguar Addams series in preparation for her tour stops here at Working for the Mandroid. In the first of two stops, Ms. Chepaitis has contributed a guest post regarding writing the series. Tomorrow I will post my review of the most recent book in the series, The Green Memory of Fear, which happens to be the creepiest of the lot.

 

I had the opportunity to take part in a ghost hunting investigation this week. I won’t tell that story here except to say that, um, strange stuff happened, and some of it involved objects being thrown.  At me.

But I bring it up only because it’s an apt metaphor for what I do to write the Fear series.

My protagonist, Jaguar Addams, rehabs the worst criminals by making them face their deepest fears.  She does this mostly through telepathic and empathic contact, diving into their experiences, sharing their darkness, sometimes sharing her own.  She is, in that sense, a ghost hunter, seeking the personal ghosts and skeletons that wounded people keep tucked away in their emotional closets, or in the cobwebby basements of their souls. 

And when I write her stories, I’m hunting those same ghosts, seeking whatever would make someone commit horrible crimes, trying to name the fears and tears that drive us away from our best human impulses and toward what looks like madness. Also seeking what someone would have to do to help those ghosts cross into the light, because Jaguar’s job is about that.

I have the sense this is good in a few ways.  I like to keep the stories fast-paced and entertaining, but I also believe we all want ways to explore and overcome our own ghosts, which are mostly composed of old fears and tears. 

Of course, the equipment I bring to the task is different than what ghost hunters have.  I don’t do EVP or thermal imaging.  In fact, I go in without weapons, bringing only the stories I have of a world that can be equally composed of nightmares and miracles, along with my best ability to translate experience into words.

Fortunately for me, Jaguar loves her work, and will keep on getting into trouble as long as she can.  And I’m more than willing to keep telling her stories because she’s one of my favorite imaginary friends, always amusing or dazzling me, always teaching me something new.

 

Barbara Chepaitis is author of eight published novels and two nonfiction books.  Her most recent novel is The Green Memory of Fear, fifth book in the ‘fear’ series featuring Jaguar Addams.  She is also director of the fiction writing program at Western College of Colorado’s Master’s program in creative writing.

 

Website:  http://www.wildreads.com

Blog: aliterarylunch.blogspot.com

facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jaguar-Addams-and-the-Fear-Series/135879429815445

 

Review: A Lunatic Fear by B.A. Chepaitis

This is the fourth in a set of reviews of the Jaguar Addams series by BA Chepaitis. You can read my review of The Fear Principle here, The Fear of God here, and Learning Fear here. Every Thursday in April I’ll be reviewing another book in the series, culminating in two stops for Chepaitis’ blog tour for the latest in the series, The Green Memory of Fear, on April 25 and 26.

A Lunatic Fear
BA Chepaitis

Wildside Press (2004)
171 pages
Mystery / Sci-Fi / Action

Purchase it from Amazon

Jaguar Addams is back. Three prisoners are brought to Planetoid 3 with symptoms of exposure to chemicals that can come only from illegal moon mining -- but who's running the lunar mining game, and where are they processing the Artemis byproducts? Alex and Jaguar are caught in a hornet's nest of politics, profits, and psychoses, as both are driven into a moon madness that cannot be denied.

Normally by this time in a series, I start getting burned out by the author’s narrative pattern and bored of the characters, especially in a cast as small as the one in Chepaitis’ Jaguar Addams series. That wasn’t the case with A Lunatic Fear. Chepaitis still managed to create an all new situation to drop Jaguar and Alex in the middle of that didn’t have much of anything in common with the previous cases. This time people are going mad and it’s assumed that illegal lunar mining and processing might be the cause behind it.

That’s not to say there isn’t a formula to the series. Again there’s a larger conspiracy with many different players and characters secretly playing both sides. Jaguar finds herself in mortal peril a time or two. Actual jaguars are used to cause a distraction. The good guys do illegal things and in the end they all come out clean, back to life as normal. None of these things bothered me though.

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Review: Learning Fear by B.A. Chepaitis

This is the third in a set of reviews of the Jaguar Addams series by BA Chepaitis. You can read the first one, for The Fear Principlehere and the second for The Fear of God here. Every Thursday in April I’ll be reviewing another book in the series, culminating in two stops for Chepaitis’ blog tour for the latest in the series,The Green Memory of Fear, on April 25 and 26.

Learning Fear
BA Chepaitis

Wildside Press (2000)
190 pages
Action / Sci-Fi

Purchase it from Amazon

On Planetoid Three, Jaguar Addams establishes an empathic link with the darkest criminal minds – forcing offenders to face the fears that drive them to their most desperate acts. But her maverick ways also drive her bosses to distraction, and now they’re sending her back to school.

Jaguar must go to a university where a controversial History of Empathic Arts is being taught. Posing as a professor, her job is to determine the agenda of an anti-empathic extremist group on campus. But someone at the university knows who Jaguar is, and is invading her mind – testing the limits of her empathic skills as she learns a very new fear.

I must apologize to Ms. Chepaitis. I read the majority of Learning Fear while under the ever increasing pain of a raging ear infection. I fear it might have influenced my ability to enjoy this volume of the Jaguar Addams series in the same way as the previous volumes. I also am not entirely sure I can put together coherent thoughts right now, so this review will be a bit shorter than usual.

The best quality about this series so far comes from the different framework Chepaitis uses in Jaguar’s adventures. The first volume of the series was an introduction to the world and its rules. The second transported the majority of the story into a virtual reality realm. This third novel takes Jaguar off of her planet prison and drops her in the middle of a small college campus in upstate New York where she’s slightly off her game and uncomfortable in her surroundings. This total change in scenery brings with it a whole new cast of characters while also separating Jaguar from her would-be love Alex, so they can both secretly pine for each other and forcefully deny to themselves that there’s any romantic feelings. It’s kind of fun to watch.

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Review: The Fear of God by B.A. Chepaitis

This is the second in a set of reviews of the Jaguar Addams series by BA Chepaitis. You can read the first one, for The Fear Principle, here. Every Thursday in April I’ll be reviewing another book in the series, culminating in two stops for Chepaitis’ blog tour for the latest in the series, The Green Memory of Fear, on April 25 and 26.

The Fear Principle
BA Chepaitis 

Ace Books (1999)
218 pages
Action / Sci-Fi

Purchase it from Amazon

Last week I reviewed The Fear Principle, which introduced me to Jaguar Addams – a pretty kick ass empathic counselor for prisoners attempting to be reformed through enhanced fear tactics. While there were some science fiction aspects to the narrative, it was more of a thriller and not my usual type of read. Despite that I enjoyed it and was eager to see this universe and these characters expanded upon.

When I was pitched these books for a blog tour, I was told that they could all be read as standalone titles. I’ve been told this about a lot of series and that’s usually not the case, but with The Fear of God, I was genuinely surprised to find that it could easily act as a standalone novel without losing much in context. There would be a little less character development and a little less build up for the will-they-won’t-they relationship, but overall the book does a great job of (re)introducing the character of Jaguar Addams, the idea of reforming criminals through having them face their worst fears, and the world she inhabits on Planetoid 3.

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Review: The Fear Principle by B.A. Chepaitis

The Fear Principle
B.A. Chepaitis

Wildside Press (1998)
192 pages
Action / Sci-Fi

Purchase it from Amazon

As part of an up-coming blog tour for BA Chepaitis’ fifth book in her Jaguar Addams series, The Green Memory of Fear, the author and Pump Up Your Book asked if I’d be willing to review the entire Jaguar Addams series. After hearing that it was about an empath on another world being used as a prison to rehabilitate prisoners using fear after a catastrophic incident had decimated the world’s population, I thought it could be a fun series to try out. So for the next five Thursdays, I’ll be reviewing each of the books in the series with BA Chepaitis stopping by on Wednesday, April 25, for a guest post about the series. After reading The Fear Principle, I’m very excited about this entire series.

The Fear Principle starts out some time in a distant future where a couple of “planetoids” have been discovered and converted into replica cities where prisoners are shipped off for rehabilitation. About ten years before, a mass hysteria raged through the general populace during what has come to be referred to as The Killing Times. Homicidal tendencies seemed to become contagious and much of the population was killed through an epidemic of serial murders. This was the atmosphere that Dr. Jaguar Addams grew up in with her grandparents in New York City. After surviving for years on her own, she’d gone to school and found herself on Planetoid Three where she uses her empathic skills to confront criminals with their deepest fears in hopes of helping them become suitable citizens again.

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