WFTM Podcast Episode 16: Riding in a R2-D2 Plane

In this week’s episode, Leslie and Fernando discuss changing the format of the podcast before reviewing all the things they’ve watched and the things that have been read, including the final volumes of Brian Azzarello’s run on Wonder Woman, the film version of The Scorch Trials, Doctor Who’s return, Typhoid Mary and much more.

Download it from the iTunes store here!

We’re now on Stitcher as well!! If Stitcher is your chosen app of podcasting choice, listen to the Working for the Mandroid podcast here

So what’s in Episode 16?

We’re changing the format of the show starting next week. Instead of one really long episode, there will be two more reasonably length episodes – one about books and comics at the first part of the week and a second about movies and television towards the end of the week. This way if you’re only interested in one subject or the other, you don’t have to search through an hour+ of us yammering to hear what you care about!

News:

Japanese Airline Debuts Star Wars Planes!

StarWarsplanes.jpg

The Martian Premieres on the International Space Station to Real Astronauts

What We’re Watching:

We finished season 1 of Empire

We grumble a bit about the first episode of season 9 of Doctor Who, “The Magician’s Apprentice”

Mix Feelings on Best Night Ever with Neil Patrick Harris

Was there anything surprising about the Emmy awards this year?

Should you see The Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials?

What We’re Reading:

Heart of Betrayal by Mary E. Pearson

Wonder Woman Volume 5: Flesh & Volume 6: Bones by Brian Azzarello & Cliff Chiang

Terrible Typhoid Mary: A True Story of the Deadliest Cook in America by Susan Campbell Bartoletti

What We Predict For the Next Week:

Fernando: Still playing a lot of Madden and looking forward to television starting back up again. (Leslie predicts this is his prediction for the next few weeks)

Leslie: New shows! Also reading Uprooted by Naomi Novak and Last Song Before Night by Ilana C. Myer 

Follow us on Twitter @WorkforMandroid and @fernborrego

Email your questions, concerns, thoughts and comments to WorkingfortheMandroid@gmail.com


Intro & Outro Music is “Robot Army” by Quiet Music for Tiny Robots, provided via freemusicarchive.org through a Creative Commons License

 

Stacking the Shelves (4): Genetic Altering, Superheroes and More Dystopias

This weekly linkup is hosted by Tynga's Reviews. Visit her site to see what everyone else has gotten their hands on recently. I've also cross posted this through The Story Siren's In My Mailbox.

These are the books that have wandered their way into my house over the last few weeks.

 

For Review

       

Something Red by Douglas Nicholas

Clean by Alex Hughes

The Law of Superheroes by James Daily & Ryan Davidson

Breathe by Sarah Crossan

Altered by Jennifer Rush

Thanks to Atria, Greenwillow/Harper Collins, Roc/Penguin, Gotham Books, and the Around the World ARC Tour

Review: Just My Type by Simon Garfield

Just My Type
Simon Garfield

Gotham (2010)
Released in paperback September 4, 2012
356 pages
Non-Fiction / Geekness

Find it on Goodreads

Purchase it on Amazon

Fonts surround us every day, on street signs and buildings, on movie posters and books, and on just about every product we buy. But where do fonts come from, and why do we need so many? Who is responsible for the staid practicality of Times New Roman, the cool anonymity of Arial, or the irritating levity of Comic Sans (and the movement to ban it)?

Typefaces are now 560 years old, but we barely knew their names until about twenty years ago when the pull-down font menus on our first computers made us all the gods of type. Beginning in the early days of Gutenberg and ending with the most adventurous digital fonts, Simon Garfield explores the rich history and subtle powers of type. He goes on to investigate a range of modern mysteries, including how Helvetica took over the world, what inspires the seeming ubiquitous use of Trajan on bad movie posters, and exactly why the all-type cover of Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus was so effective. It also examines why the "T" in the Beatles logo is longer than the other letters and how Gotham helped Barack Obama into the White House. A must-have book for the design conscious, Just My Type's cheeky irreverence will also charm everyone who loved Eats, Shoots & Leaves and Schott's Original Miscellany.

This book has changed my life. It took all of 25 pages for me to completely reset my brain to become consciously aware of the fonts that surround me. The ones I choose to use in my job, the ones I find in advertising, the ones that are abused in pop culture… they’re all jumping out to me when they were just a background visual sound to the words they created. This book is insane and fascinating and geektastic. Most people probably don’t really think about fonts or who creates them or how they’re developed – at least I didn’t until reading Just My Type – but Simon Garfield has put together a fun history of something that we interact with subconsciously nearly every moment.

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Stacking the Shelves (3): Aliens, Sherlock Holmes, Steampunk and More

This weekly linkup is hosted by Tynga's Reviews. Visit her site to see what everyone else has gotten their hands on recently.

Now that I've done my two part Comic Con list, it's finally time to catch up on all the books that have arrived at my house in the last month. I don't know if it was the networking or what, but packages have been arriving nearly on a daily basis. Here's what I've added to my shelves recently.

For Review

   

I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore

The Power of Six by Pittacus Lore

The Rise of Nine by Pittacus Lore

Thank you so much to Harper Collins for sending me the series for review.

   

Sherlock Holmes & The Army of Dr. Moreau by Guy Adams

The Miracle Inspector by Helen Smith (for a blog tour in October)

Thank you to Titan Books and Helen Smith for sending me these.

     

The Map of the Sky by Felix J Palma (finished copy)

Johnny Hiro by Fred Chao

Just My Type by Simon Garfield

Every Day by David Levithan

Thank you to Atria's Galley Alley program, Tor, Gothan Books and Knopf.

 

Next week perhaps I'll go through some of the e-galleys I've picked up the last few weeks. What books did you get your hands on this week that you're most excited about?

Contest: Win Just My Type by Simon Garfield or The Periodic Table of Fonts

Penguin and Gotham Books are celebrating the September 4 paperback release of Just My Type by offering you lovely Working for the Mandroid visitors the opportunity to win a copy of the book or as awesome poster of The Periodic Table of Typefaces. Just My Type is the NY Times bestselling book by Simon Garfield perfect for design and font geeks. It turns the history of fonts and their development into an entertaining guide of what fonts really say about designers and the message they’re trying to convey. Here’s a quick description of the book:

A hugely entertaining and revealing guide to the history of type that asks, What does your favorite font say about you?

Fonts surround us every day, on street signs and buildings, on movie posters and books, and on just about every product we buy. But where do fonts come from, and why do we need so many? Who is responsible for the staid practicality of Times New Roman, the cool anonymity of Arial, or the irritating levity of Comic Sans (and the movement to ban it)?

Typefaces are now 560 years old, but we barely knew their names until about twenty years ago when the pull-down font menus on our first computers made us all the gods of type. Beginning in the early days of Gutenberg and ending with the most adventurous digital fonts, Simon Garfield explores the rich history and subtle powers of type. He goes on to investigate a range of modern mysteries, including how Helvetica took over the world, what inspires the seeming ubiquitous use of Trajan on bad movie posters, and exactly why the all-type cover of Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus was so effective. It also examines why the "T" in the Beatles logo is longer than the other letters and how Gotham helped Barack Obama into the White House. A must-have book for the design conscious, Just My Type's cheeky irreverence will also charm everyone who loved Eats, Shoots & Leaves and Schott's Original Miscellany.

Click to see a larger version.If you’d like to win a brand new paperback copy of Just My Type or a copy of the Periodic Table of Typefaces (to the right), enter the Rafflecopter form below. This contest is open to US mailing addresses only. There will be four winners – two books and two posters – and the contest will run through midnight central time next Saturday, August 18. Winners will be chosen via Rafflecopter and they will have 48 hours to respond via email before another winner will be chosen. Prizes are provided by the wonderful people at Gotham Books, so we thank them for the prizes for this contest.

If you know any graphic designers, font geeks, history buffs or readers who just love cramming their head full of trivia, they will love this book. Enter to win a copy below. Good luck!

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Review: Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent? by Brian Cronin

Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent and Other Amazing Comic Book Trivia!
Brian Cronin

Plume (2012)
288 pages
Comics / Trivia

Buy it here from Amazon

Outrageous, fascinating and bizarre facts from every corner of the comic book universe. What comic book artist was the recipient of an on-stage thank you from Paul McCartney and an on-air apology from Johnny Carson? What superhero got his powers by being bitten by a mongoose? What popular NPR host was forever immortalized as a "bad boyfriend" in a notable comic book? In Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent?, author Brian Cronin will answer those questions and more by revealing the most obscure, wacky and surprising facts about comics—from the characters and creators, to the TV shows, movies and merch. Cronin has teamed up with some of the top comic book writers and artists of today to present 100 trivia lists, including:

·        Nine Celebrities That Guest-Starred in Comic Books…without Their Permission
·        Seven Bands That Got Their Names from Comics
·        Ten Crazy Items Found on Batman’s Utility Belt
·        Five Comic Book Inventions That Eventually Became Real
·        Five Stupidest Superhero Origins
·        And much, much more!

From Batman to Spiderman, Aquaman to the X-Men, each list in Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent? will entertain and inform whether you’re a hardcore geek or a casual fan.

Despite my seeming obsession with comics, I don’t have a lot of background with the various standard DC and Marvel superhero series. Their individual universes are so intricate and interwoven that it was always such a daunting task to try to break into those worlds and not feel lost. Therefore the majority of my historical knowledge of the various mainstream comic lines comes from cultural osmosis, movies, animated cartoons, and the occasional graphic novel (generally in the Batman family) that I’ve picked up in recent years.

Therefore I found Brian Cronin’s Why Does Batman Carry Shark Repellent? incredibly interesting and often time hysterical. Cronin runs the Comics Should Be Good blog on ComicResource.com, which is filled with random comic facts and analysis of the regularly ridiculous story lines of comic books both past and present. Having run this blog for seven years, it’s no surprise that he’s collected so much random knowledge about anything dealing with comics.

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Review: The Social Media Mind by David Amerland

The Social Media Mind: How social media is changing business, politics and science and helps create a new world order
David Amerland

New Line Publishing (2012)
252 pages
Non-fiction / Marketing

Purchase a copy from Amazon

This is not the standard review fare here at Working for the Mandroid, but when given the opportunity to read a copy of David Amerland’s The Social Media Mind, I graciously agreed to a review in return for a copy. As someone who is fascinated by the rapidly changing and always moving realm of social media, I was hoping that Amerland would be able to give me some insights and/or tips on how to better utilize social media to promote this site as well as to assist in my on-going job search. I came away disappointed.

I should have known from the long-winded and grammatically awkward subtitle that the writing in this book would not be the best. What I wasn’t expecting was the blatant overuse of commas except when commas were actually supposed to be used. Many times commas are the only thing standing between what you’re trying to say and something that just doesn’t make sense. I found myself having to constantly re-read and attempt to decipher clauses to get the author’s meaning. It caused a lot of frustration and made it hard to accept the content within.

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